Advising Guide

I. Advising

Advising Procedures

1. What is the advising policy for ANSC?

The Animal Science Department has mandatory advising, which means that a student must fulfill their advising requirement every semester prior to being allowed to register. Registration appointments (see below) are determined by your number of credits, so students with the most credits register first.  It is vitally important that you satisfy your advising requirement before your designated registration date. Once you have completed advising - and ONLY once you have completed advising - will the departmental block that prevents you from registering be lifted. If you do not complete advising, this block will not be removed and you will NOT be able to register. Since space in some classes can be competitive, it is in your best interests to get cleared of ALL blocks well in advance of your registration date. Make sure to visit our ANSC Fall 2017 Timeline update for information on our new advising structure.

2. What is the ANSC advising expectation for students?

Students are expected to read and adhere to all posted ANSC policies and procedures. It is your responsibility as a student to know your requirements and make sure you are planning to take them in semesters in which they are offered. Resources to help you in creating your course plan, including a step-by-step guide that walks you through the process, are readily available.

3. What should I discuss with my faculty mentor?

Students are required to meet with their assigned mentor every Fall. The purpose of pairing students with a faculty mentor is to allow students to build a mentoring relationship, through meetings and conversation. The role of the faculty mentor is not to pick courses for a student or plan their semesters, but to help guide more big-picture conversations. As you prepare to meet with your faculty mentor, be prepared to discuss things like your career goals, internships, and what steps you have already taken towards pursuing your goals. Ask your mentor for advice regarding networking with future employers, graduate school programs, or internships providers. Faculty can also help direct you to resources if you are struggling or facing challenges. By using your time with your mentor effectively, you can build a lasting relationship you will carry with you even after you graduate!

Students with questions on course plan building or program requirements should visit our extensive Course Planning Resource page and visit with our ANSC Peer Mentor.

4. How do I find my registration time?

Students can check their registration time by clicking the Appointment and Registration link on Testudo. Your registration time represents the earliest time you can register, but you can register at any point after that time/date, once your advising block is cleared. When you check your registration time, make sure you see if you have any other blocks, and if so, consult this Registrar resource to what they mean and how to remove them. 

**Your registration time does NOT represent a meeting time with your faculty mentor.** You need to contact your mentor well in advance of your registration time to set up a meeting and have your electronic block removed. For students who are in group advising, you will need to follow the instructions you receive through your ELMS group and/or email regarding your advising and signing up for an advising session (which will fulfill your advising requirement).

5. What is a Senior Audit?

The Senior Audit is a checkpoint audit to make sure you are staying on track with graduation requirements, and are generally requested from ANSC students who have completed 75 total credits and at least one semester at UMD. Students required to complete a Senior Audit will receive an email notification and an invitation to the Senior Audit ELMS group, which you will need to accept to submit your audit. Students in this group will be required to submit a completed Senior Audit before your registration block will be removed for that semester, in addition to the other advising activities you must complete that semester. Audits submitted with significant errors may be required to re-submit a corrected version before registration block is removed.

Please consult this Guide to Completing Your Senior Audit, which includes an example of a correctly completed audit. Audit forms can be found on the Forms page of the ANSC website. 

Changing Your Major

1. What if a student wants to switch options within ANSC?

To change options within the ANSC major, there is an optional assignment in your assigned advising Elms course, which will allow you to submit a request to change your option. Once your request has been processed, you will need to submit a revised 4 Year Plan reflecting your new major option. For complete details, refer to your Elms course and/or email ansc-undergrad-prog@umd.edu

2. What if a student wants to switch into ANSC from another major?

If you are an actively enrolled student at UMD and are interested in switching into the ANSC major, you will need to attend a major change seminar. These seminars are offered approximately once per month, and review what to expect from ANSC curriculum, advising policies, and address next steps you will need to follow to change into the major. There is no need to RSVP; simply choose which session you wish to attend and show up!

3. What if a student wants to switch out of ANSC?

We cannot advise students on course requirements for another major, so we want to make sure students are being advised properly by their new major. If a student is interested in switching out, they need to talk to an advisor in the desired new major, and comply with that department's requirements for switching majors. ANSC can give students a final advising stamp if a major change won't take effect until the following semester, but students must provide confirmation that they have met with an advisor in their new major and are working on declaring that major. If a student is not making progress in the ANSC major, ANSC cannot continue to remove advising blocks, so students interested in switching out need to get their major change finalized as quickly as possible. Students who are unsure what major they want to switch to can go to the Department of Letter and Sciences for guidance in selecting a major. 

Additional Majors/Minors

1. What is the difference between a double degree and a double major?

A double major requires students to complete all requirements of the two majors (with only 18 credits applied to both) and complete a total of 120 credits. Double degrees require the completion of 150 credits and students are awarded two degrees. More information about double majors/degrees can be found within the student's major college. 

2. What is a minor?

A minor is an approved, limited but structured concentration in a coherent field of study outside of a major. Not all academic programs offer minors. For a list of minors please visit the UMD Course Catalog

3. What are my options for a minor?

ANSC does not currently offer a minor in this department. For a list of the minors offered by the University, please visit the UMD Course Catalog and search for the list of minors. Students are free to pursue any of the minors listed regardless of their current major or department, so long as they can meet both sets of requirements.

4. How can I add a second major or a minor?

A student who wishes to complete a second major or double degree concurrently with his or her primary major of record must obtain permission in advance from the appropriate departments and colleges. To add a double major or double degree, an ANSC student must fill out the Double major/double degree form. 

Once the form has been completed, it must be signed by the ANSC Undergraduate Office followed by the College of AGNR Academic Programs Office, as well as the departmental advisor and College of the second major/degree. Students adding a second major must decide which major will be their primary major, as that determines who signs off on what on the form. Students interested in double majoring should look to declare as early as possible, but in no case later than one full academic year before the expected date of graduation. Final approval of a double major program must be obtained from each of the appropriate departments and college(s). 

In order to obtain approval, students must complete all of the requirements specified for both the primary and secondary major. Courses taken for one major may be counted as appropriate as part of the degree requirements for the general education programs. If two colleges are involved in the double major program, the student must designate which college will be responsible for the maintenance of records and certification of general education requirements. 

NOTE: A student who wishes to add a Limited Enrollment Program as a second major must do so at the earliest possible opportunity to assure that specific credit and GPA requirements can be met.

Exception to Policy

1. What is an Exception to Policy and how do I request one?

An Exception to Policy is a request for an exception that cannot be made at the departmental level, and must be made at the college level. Any student who wishes to request an Exception must first discuss the request with the Assistant Director of the ANSC Undergrad Office. In most cases, students will be required to set up a meeting to discuss the exception. Once a student has met with the ANSC Assistant Director, the student will then fill out the Exception to Policy request form, where a written explanation detailing the reasons behind the request is mandatory. Once the request is submitted, the College will contact the ANSC Undergrad Office for any additional information about the request. The College then uses all information provided from the student and advisor and makes a decision accordingly. Note that as is stated AGNR policy "AGNR does not make exceptions for poor judgment, poor performance, or forgetfulness.  It is your responsibility to know and adhere to all academic policies."

2. What actions require an Exception to Policy?

An Exception to Policy request must be filled out for any of the following items. When requesting an exception, students should keep in mind that exceptions are only given in “rare and extraordinary circumstances” in which a problem is “out of the control of a student and not predictable.” Requests are not guaranteed and are considered on a case-by-case basis:

  • Credit limit - request to take over 17 credits
  • Time conflict (trying to take two courses that may overlap)
  • Late Add (adding a course after the end of the schedule adjustment period)
  • Late/Retroactive drop without a "W"
  • Late/Retroactive drop with a "W"
  • Grading method change
  • Repeat Policy (over 18 credits)
  • Repeat Policy (3rd attempt of same course)
  • Enroll "off-campus" within final 30 credits
  • Exceed the 4-credit drop limit in one semester
  • Take a Graduate course for undergraduate credit

Non-UMD Registration

1. How does a student get permission to take a course at another school?

How does a student get permission to take a course at another school? 

  1. Students must fill out the online form for Permission to Enroll in Another Institution.
  2. If the online form cannot identify an equivalent course, students can visit the Transfer Credit Evaluation Center website and see if an equivalent to the UMD course exists at the desired institution.
  3. Once a student submits the form, the request is reviewed by both the Department and the College. Students will then be contacted only if there are problems with or questions about the request. 
  4. If the permission is granted, the student can enroll in the course at another institution, by following that school's posted requirements. 
  5. Once the student has successfully completed the course at the other institution, they need to make sure that the Registrar's Office at that school sends the official transcript/record to UMD's Office of the Registrar. This is the only way the course will be added to their UMD record.

IMPORTANT NOTES: Students taking a course at another institution must note the following policies:

  1. Students may transfer no more than 60 credits of their degree from a 2yr college and 90 from a 4yr institution.
  2. Students MUST complete their fundamental math (FM) and fundamental english (FE) General Education requirements here at UMD, so requests to take these courses at another institution will not be granted.
  3. A student's final 30 credits must be taken at UM. Students with extenuating circumstances may request an exception to this (see Exception to Policy.)
  4. Generally, college-level courses completed at regionally-accredited institutions will transfer, provided the course is similar in scope, content and level to courses offered at UMD and a grade of "C-" or higher is earned. Grades of "D-" or higher are accepted for courses completed at Maryland public institutions. More information about UMD'S Tranfer Policies is available through the Transfer Credit Center
  5. Students interested in taking a Chemistry course at another institution need to make sure they have read and understood Chemistry's policies on which courses will and won't transfer.

Special Advising/Academic Probation

1. What is "Special Advising"?

Special advising is when the Assistant Director of the Undergraduate Program has to give a student individual stamps for each course they want to add or drop. This is in addition to the general academic block that is removed after a student completes their advising session. 

2. Who needs "Special Advising"?

Student athletes, students on academic probation (below a 2.0 GPA). 

3. What is Academic Probation?

Academic Probation: Students will be placed on academic probation if their cumulative GPA falls below 2.0. Normally, a student is expected to attain a 2.0 cumulative GPA at the end of any probationary semester. Students who fail to achieve a 2.0 cumulative GPA at the end of their probationary semester may be academically dismissed, depending on their credit level as detailed below.

  • Students who have earned 60 credits or more will be dismissed from the University in the event their cumulative GPA remains below 2.0 at the end of their probationary semester.Students who are on probation and attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of a winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal in the subsequent semester.
  • Students who are on academic probation and have earned fewer than 60 credits will be permitted to continue on academic probation if a minimum semester GPA of 2.0 is achieved in each semester of probation.
    • Full-time students must complete 9 or more credits in each semester. A completed credit is defined as credit for any course in which a student receives a grade of A, B, C, D, F, P, or S.
    • Students who meet this requirement will be permitted to continue on probation until the close of the semester (excluding winter and summer terms) in which they attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0.
    • Students who are on probation will be dismissed if they have not achieved a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of the semester in which they complete 60 credits.
    • Students who are on probation and attain a cumulative GPA of 2.0 at the end of a winter or summer term will not be subject to dismissal in the subsequent semester.

4. How does a student go about getting the special advising stamps?

Students who require special advising stamps must send an email to the ANSC Assistant Director ansc-undergrad-prog@umd.edu with the list of courses and section numbers they wish to either add or drop (see format below). Course choices will be reviewed and students may be required to come in for a meeting, depending on their current standing and course history. Once courses have been reviewed, students will be granted the requested permissions for approved courses. If a student wishes to drop or add a course at any time during the time they are on probation, they must follow this procedure to request and be granted this specific permission.

The email sent to the Assistant Director should be in the following format (specifying all requested course changes):
Add CHEM131, section xxxx
Add CHEM132, section yyyy 
Drop BSCI105, section xxxx

II. Course Planning

1. How do I construct my course plan/4-year plan?

The first step in making a 4-year plan is to go and carefully read this guide on how to create one. That guide, along with our Course Planning Resources, will provide you with all the information you need to build your own customized course plan!

  • Students who require additional help with constructing their course plans should visit the ANSC Peer Mentor or the AGNR Peer Mentors - current upper classmen within the College of AGNR who are available to help students learn to use UMD programs and build their course plans.

2. How do I update my course plan?

All students in ANSC create and submit a course plan in their first semester in ANSC, which is reviewed by the ANSC Undergraduate Office. Students are provided with detailed feedback, and plans are approved once they accurately represent all requirements and a workable plan for completing them. However, course plans are a living document, and students are welcome and encouraged to update their plans according to their interests and class availability. You do not have to get permission or approval to update your course plan, but you do need to make sure your plan is still workable and contains all requirements.

As you revise and change your course plan, make sure you are staying on track by asking yourself the following questions:

Have I made sure that:

  • ALL requirements (Gen Ed courses, major requirements, etc) are still included on my plan?
  • I have scheduled prerequisite courses before the course they are a prerequisite for?
  • I am planning to take courses in the semester in which they are offered?
  • My planned coursework adds up to a minimum of 120 credits?
  • My plan represents workable semesters - no more than 3 labs in one semester, a reasonable amount of credits (recommended no more than 17), not too many challenging courses at once?
  • I am meeting benchmarks, minimum grade requirements, and the major required GPA?
  • I followed an “if I take a requirement out of one semester, make sure to put it back on the plan in another semester where it is offered” approach?

Making sure you can answer “yes” to all of these questions when updating your plan will insure you stay on track with completing your requirements, giving you the confidence you need to feel comfortable with maintaining and editing your plan. 

Students are encouraged to work with our ANSC Peer Mentor, who can help you with using our resources and updating your plan, as well as offering you valuable student perspective on the classes and workload you might be considering. 

3. How do I use UAchieve to run a degree audit?

UAchieve is the degree auditing tool available to students, which populates automatically with courses you have completed that fulfill requirements. This is a very useful tool to help you keep track of which requirements you have already completed, and what you still need to take. Our ANSC Peer Mentor is a great resource in helping you interpret your audit, but there is also a UAchieve user guide from the Registrar's website that can help you in navigating reading your UAchieve report.  The instructional videos at that link will walk you through how to use the system, so you should watch those how-to videos for a quick intro to the system.

Regarding courses being displayed in UAchieve, remember that just because a course is not reflected in UAchieve does not mean that the course is not being counted for your degree requirements. Many of these edits have to be made manually, and that can take time. Typically, audits are updated when we process senior audits and again when we process graduation clearances. Courses taken between those two periods that have to be entered manually will not be updated in UAchieve until graduation clearances are being processed.

If you have received confirmation that a course counts for one of our requirements, whether you received an email directly, a posting to the listserv, or a posting on our website, then you are being awarded credit for that course and that degree requirement.

If there is something on your audit that you feel is truly an error, please contact the ANSC Undergraduate Office so that it can be corrected. If it is just something like a course we have posted as counting as an Advanced ANSC course isn't showing as such, you do not need to contact us, as discussed above.

4. What should I know about course prerequisites?

It is vitally important that you make sure you have completed all required prerequisites for a course prior to the semester in which you will be taking that course. Reading and paying attention to prerequisites for courses is YOUR responsibility as a student, and not adhering to required prerequisites can and will get you dropped from courses. Prerequisites for any given course are included in the course description in the Schedule of Classes.  If you are not sure what a prerequisite is asking for, ask that department and get clarification BEFORE you register. Never assume that a prerequisite may be taken as a co-requisite.

5. What are benchmarks?

Benchmarks are courses students must complete by the time they have completed a designated number of semesters within the ANSC major. Meeting these benchmarks is indicative of successful progress through the major. Measurement of benchmarks begins when a student starts that specific major at UMD. All students are expected to complete the required benchmarks by the end of the indicated semester. Students who are not meeting benchmarks and not making timely progress towards their degree will be required to change into a new major. Visit our Benchmarks page for a list of the benchmarks for each option.

6. What Chemistry courses do I have to take?

This page contains detailed information on which Chemistry courses are required for each option, as well as reminder on the order in which the courses MUST be taken. ALL students must have successfully completed (earned a C- or better) all of the previous courses to take the next course in the sequence. This is a strict rule in the Chemistry department, and they do not grant exceptions to it.  Please make absolutely sure you are paying attention to this sequence when building your 4-year plan.

7. What is the ANSC Genetics requirement?

Beginning in Spring 2018, students in the Animal Care & Management option (and any students still remaining under the old Equine Studies option) will have the choice to take either ANSC327 (Molecular Genetics) or ANSC450 (Animal Breeding Plans) to satisfy the Genetics requirement for this major.  If a Care & Management student wishes to take both classes, then the second course can count as an “Advanced Animal Sciences Elective.”

Students in the Science/Pre-Professional option (and any students still remaining under the old Animal Biotechnology option) will continue to be required to take ANSC327 for their Genetics requirement, and ANSC 450 will continue to be an option to fulfill the “Advanced Animal Sciences Elective” requirement for this option.

Students in our major may NOT take BSCI222 in place of this requirement. The only exceptions to this are:

  1. Students who are confirmed to be enrolled in a double major or program (such as ILS Scholars) that requires BSCI222.
  2. Students who transfer into ANSC (either from another school or another major at UMD) who have already taken BSCI222 prior to entering ANSC.

Aside from these two exceptions students MUST take ANSC327, or if they are in the Animal Care & Management option, ANSC450.

8. What are electives?

Electives (not to be confused with Advanced ANSC Electives - which are required upper level courses), are courses students can take if they still need credits after completing all degree required courses. Students must have a minimum of 120 credits to graduate, and we can only take up a certain number of those credits with required courses. If you have completed all your major and general education requirements and still have less than 120 credits, you can take whatever you like to reach 120 credits!

9. I have an Associate's Degree - how does that impact my requirements?

Students who have earned an Associate's Degrees from a Maryland institution (AA degrees earned from a non-Maryland school will not be accepted) do not have to complete all individual General Education requirements, as the AA will satisfy these. Students with a verified AA must still complete ALL ANSC requirements, regardless of if they have a Gen Ed/CORE designation or not. Students under Gen Ed with a verified AA must complete Professional Writing and any additional credits to complete a total of 40 credits of lower level/general education courses. Students under CORE with a verified AA must must complete Professional Writing (unless exempt due to earning an A in ENGL101) and two Advanced Studies courses. Students in the CORE program must earn a total of 43 credits worth of lower level/general education courses.

CORE vs. New Gen Ed

1. How do I know if I'm under CORE or Gen Ed?

  • All students who enter UMD Fall 2016 or later are under the new Gen Ed. 
  • Your unofficial transcript will indicate if you are CORE or Gen Ed. You can find this designation on the top left hand side, under your email address.
  • Your CORE or Gen Ed designation is based upon a few things, including when you matriculated at UMD, and whether you came as a new freshman or as a transfer (and where you transferred from, if applicable). If you are still unsure if you are under Gen Ed or CORE, please consult the General Education FAQ.
  • More information on CORE
  • More information on Gen Ed

2. What is Advanced Studies CORE?

The AS CORE requirement is for two courses (6 credits) of 300 or 400 level courses taken outside the major and after 60 credits. These have to be courses with a significant academic component - so something like studio art or painting would not qualify. Detailed information about any aspect of CORE can be found on the Undergraduate Studies website.

3. I notice on the curriculum worksheet that BIOM301 is listed in an AS CORE space. Is this a required course?

NO, this is not a program requirement. It is merely a recommended courses to satisfy this requirement because it will satisfy the statistics requirement that many graduate/professional programs have for admission. 
 

Repeating Courses

1. How many credits can a student repeat?

Students may repeat no more than 18 credits. 

2. How many times can a student repeat an individual course?

A student can only attempt a course twice. All attempts at a course (including withdrawing with a W or failing the course) count as an attempt. Students may petition to repeat a course a 3rd time, by filling out an Exception to Policy request, but these are very rarely granted and only under the most extenuating circumstances. Students who would require a 3rd attempt to pass a course fundamental to the major will likely be required to switch out of ANSC.

3. What is the "freshman forgiveness" policy?

To help freshmen and transfer students adjust to the UMCP campus, the following two exceptions allow for the cumulative GPA to be calculated so that only the higher grade is included. However, any grade earned in prior attempts of a repeated course will appear on the student's transcript, regardless of whether the grade is dropped from, or averaged into, the cumulative grade point average:

  • When the repeated course was taken within the student's first semester at UMCP

– or –

  • When the repeated course was taken within the student's first 24 credit hours attempted (including transfer credit, but not including AP or IB credits) or within the semester during which the student reached the 24th credit hour attempted

If a student repeats by transfer a course that was taken before or during the semester in which the student reached 24 credits attempted (including transfer credits) and the transfer grade is higher, then the original grade in the course will be excluded from the G.P.A. calculation. If the course was taken after the semester in which the student reached 24 credits attempted then the original grade remains in the GPA calculation.

4. What is the minimum grade requirement for ANSC?

Please visit the Minimum Grade Requirement page for the details of ANSC's minimum grade policy. 

Acedemic Honors

1. What is Academic Honors?

The College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Honors Program is intended to provide academically talented students with the opportunity for significant professional development through pursuit of a scholarly investigation under the guidance of a faculty adviser and to provide recognition of that development through the college honors citation. The scholarly investigation should go beyond the scope of the regular curriculum.

2. What is the eligibility for Academic Honors Program?

  • The student must be enrolled as a College of Agriculture and Natural Resources major.

  • The student must have completed at least 56 credits (junior standing) and must have completed at least 12 credits in their major.

  • The student must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.2 and a minimum gpa of 3.2 in courses required in the major.

3. What are the requirements that need to be met in order to be considered for the Honors Program?

  • Six or more credits in upper-level honors courses, seminars, or workshops. These courses may be from any department on campus and may also be used to meet other requirements such as CORE Advanced Studies if approved as such. Graduate courses in the department (600-level), may substitute for any part of this requirement.

  • Six or more credits of DEPARTMENTAL 388 Honors Thesis Research under the direction of a faculty member, culminating in a thesis and satisfactory performance on an oral defense of the thesis conducted by two or more faculty members. Following a successful defense the student needs to file appropriate forms available from the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources Academic Programs Office.

4. How do I apply for Academic Honors?

Students interested in entering the AGNR College Honors Program should visit the AGNR Undergraduate Honors page, and follow the application instructions posted there. Admission will be based on grades, background and work experience as well as evidence of the motivation and maturity necessary for the successful completion of the program. Admission will also be contingent upon the availability of a faculty advisor. 

5. What are the privileges associated with receiving Academic Honors?

All students enrolled in departmental honors are members of the University Honors Program and as such, may register for Honors courses and seminars offered through the program. Other benefits include eligibility for Honors scholarships, Honors housing, and participation in all Honors student activities and organizations.

Graduation & Information for Seniors

1. What is a Senior Audit?

Senior Audits are generally requested from ANSC students who have completed 75 total credits and at least two semesters in ANSC at UMD. Students required to complete a Senior Audit will receive an email notification and an invitation to the Senior Audit ELMS group, which you will need to accept to submit your audit. Students in this group will be required to submit a completed Senior Audit before your registration block will be removed for that semester, regardless of what other advising activities you must complete that semester. Audits submitted with significant errors may be required to re-submit a corrected version before registration block is removed.

Please consult this Guide to Completing Your Senior Audit, which includes an example of a correctly completed audit. Audit forms can be found on the Forms page of the ANSC website.

2. What does a student need to do for the semester they're planning to graduate?

Students must apply for graduation. The deadline for applying is the last day of schedule adjustment (same as for drop/add) for a given semester. Students apply online using Testudo.

    Online Resources

    1. How do I access Canvas/ELMS?

    You can log in to ELMS using your university login information. 

    2. What is the University's official communications method, and how do I update my contact information?

    The University has adopted email as the primary means for sending official communications to students. Academic advisors, faculty, and campus administrative offices use email to convey important information and time-sensitive notices. All enrolled students are provided a University email address. Students are responsible for reading their email and keeping their email address up to date. Failure to check email, errors in forwarding email, and returned email due to mailbox full or user unknown will not excuse a student from missing announcements or deadlines. Therefore it is vitally important that the address listed for you in the system is one you check regularly. You can update your email address through Testudo

    3. Where can I read some tips on how to communicate professionally?

    As students, it is important to make sure that you are doing everything possible to communicate effectively. Effective communication and proper email etiquette will go a long way towards making a good impression, and building positive relationships with faculty members is something you should strive for. This guide to proper email etiquette when conversing with University faculty and staff will get you off on the right foot! Please pay especially careful attention to the details regarding how to address your professor or advisor, as well as reasonable expectations for a response time.

    4. Where can I view my final grades for the semester?

    Students can view final grades through Testudo

    III. Registration

    Making/Adjusting Your Schedule

    1. How do I search for Gen Ed courses?

    Use this detailed guide on searching CORE/Gen Ed courses.

    2. How do I adjust my schedule (drop/add)?

    Visit this screencapped guide to adjusting your schedule.

    3. How do I get on a waitlist for a class, check my waitlist status, or remove myself from a waitlist?

    View this additional screencapped guide on waitlists - including adding/removing, and waitlist check-in. 

    Important notes about waitlists

    1. Being on a waitlist DOES NOT guarantee you will be granted a spot in that course. Never assume that placement on a waitlist will equal a spot in the course. Always have an alternate plan in the event you do not get into the course
    2. You cannot add yourself to a waitlist for a course you already have a seat in. So if you are in one section of a course, you cannot waitlist another section at the same time. 
    3. If you are still on the waitlist for a course when the semester begins, you MUST check in every day (instructions on how to do this are below), or you will be automatically dropped from the waitlist. If you are dropped from the waitlist, you will not be able to reclaim your spot.
    4. Not all courses have waitlists, and some courses have caps on their waitlists to encourage students to fill open seats in other sections. If you have followed the instructions and do not see the option to add yourself to a waitlist for a particular section, it can mean that the course either doesn't have a waitlist or that the waitlist has already reached its cap. 

    4. How do I sign up for a winter or summer term class at UMD?

    Schedules, deadlines, and policies for winter or summer term classes are available through the Office of Extended Studies. Once you have identified the class you would like to sign up for, you register using the Drop/Add program the same as you do in spring or fall. *Please make sure to read the restrictions on the maximum credits you can register for in these condensed sections.

    UMD Registration/Blocks

    1. How many credits can a student register for per semester?

    The most credits a student can register for without a special exception (see Exception to Policy section for more information) is 17 credits. 

    2. How will a student know when their registration time is?

    Students can check their registration time by clicking the Appointment and Registration link on Testudo. Your registration time represents the earliest time you can register, but you can register at any point after that time/date, once your advising block is cleared.

    **Your registration time does NOT represent a meeting time with your faculty mentor.** You need to contact your mentor well in advance of your registration time to set up a meeting and have your electronic block removed. For students who are in group advising, you will need to follow the instructions you receive through your ELMS group and/or email regarding your advising and signing up for an advising session (which will fulfill your advising requirement).

    3. What do the different registration blocks mean?

    A detailed description of all possible registration blocks (and how to resolve them) can be found through the Registrar.

    The department has no ability to remove anything but the mandatory advising blocks. Students must see the offices they are directed to when they view the block. Some examples include:

    • Immunization block - must go to the Health Center
    • Financial block - must talk to the Bursar
    • Fundamental studies (math or English) block - must go see the College of AGNR Academic Programs office.

    4. What is the time period for students to drop/add courses without penalty?

    Students are free to adjust their schedule throughout the schedule adjustment period at the beginning of a given semester. Students should always check and be aware of what the last day for schedule adjustment is, but as a general rule it is two weeks from the first day of the semester. Courses dropped after the end of the schedule adjustment period will show as a W on the transcript (see "Dropping a Course with a W" below for more info), and will count as an attempt. 

    5. What if dropping a course would put a student below 12 credits?

    12 credits is the minimum a student needs to be enrolled in to be considered a full-time student. There are several items that may be contingent upon them having this status. It should be stressed to the students that these are just some of the possible things that could be affected, and that they should speak with parents/examine their individual situation carefully before making this decision. Some of the things most commonly effected are:

    • Health insurance - health insurance providers may require an adult child to be registered as a full-time student to be covered under their parents' health insurance
    • Scholarships - most (if not all) scholarships require students to be full-time to be eligible and to receive scholarship money
    • Financial aid - depending on the financial aid package, it may be contingent on full-time status
    • On-campus housing - Students living in on-campus housing are required to be full time students. Dropping below 12 credits can jeopardize future housing.

    1. What does a student need to consider when dropping a course with a W?

    Factors to consider when determining whether or not to drop a course with a W 

    1. Number of times a student can attempt a course:

    A student can only attempt a course twice. All attempts at a course (including withdrawing with a W or failing the course) count as an attempt.

    Students may petition to repeat a course a 3rd time, (see Exceptions to Policy) but exceptions are only given in “rare and extraordinary circumstances” in which a problem is “out of the control of a student and not predictable.” Requests are not guaranteed and are considered on a case-by-case basis. Students who would require a 3rd attempt to pass a course fundamental to the major may be required to switch out of ANSC. 

    2. What is the "freshman forgiveness" (repeat) policy? 

    To help freshmen and transfer students adjust to the UMCP campus, the following two exceptions allow for the cumulative GPA to be calculated so that only the higher grade is included. However, any grade earned in prior attempts of a repeated course will appear on the student's transcript, regardless of whether the grade is dropped from, or averaged into, the cumulative grade point average:

    • When the repeated course was taken within the student's first semester at UMCP
      - or -
    • When the repeated course was taken within the student's first 24 credit hours attempted (including transfer credit, but not including AP or IB credits) or within the semester during which the student reached the 24th credit hour attempted.

    3. What is considered a passing grade for ANSC?

    Please review the Minimum Grade Policy for ANSC. Note that students who were enrolled in ANSC Spring 2016 or prior will remain under the old policy.

    Make sure you carefully read and understand the Minimum Grade Policy as it affects you, including the requirement for a 2.0 GPA in major required courses.

    4. Benchmarks and progress in ANSC

    Make sure that dropping a course will not put you in violation of ANSC Benchmarks. Students who are not meeting benchmarks and not making timely progress towards their degree will be required to change into a new major.

    5. Repercussions of going below 12 credits: 

    12 credits is the minimum a student needs to be enrolled in to be considered a full-time student. There are several items that may be contingent upon them having this status. It should be stressed to the students that these are just some of the possible things that could be affected, and that they should speak with parents/examine their individual situation carefully before making this decision. Some of the things most commonly effected are:

    • Health insurance - health insurance providers may require an adult child to be registered as a full-time student to be covered under their parents' health insurance
    • Scholarships - most (if not all) scholarships require students to be full-time to be eligible and to receive scholarship money
    • Financial aid - depending on the financial aid package, it may be contingent on full-time status
    • On-campus housing - Students living in on-campus housing are required to be full time students. Dropping below 12 credits can jeopardize future housing.

    IV. Financial

    Scholarships

    Student Account

    1. Where can I find information on my student account?

    Students can access their accounts and financial information through the Testudo, and manage financial matters through Student Financial Services and Cashiering

    Financial Aid

    1. Where can I find more information about financial aid?

    For more information please visit the University of Maryland Financial Aid website.